Awards

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Press

"THIS IS A POWERFUL, COMPELLING MOVIE"
- JEFFREY LYONS/LYONS DEN RADIO


"COMPELLING… NO GOD, NO MASTER RE-CREATES ITS PERIOD MILIEU WITH A VIVID REALISM… THE FILM RELATES ITS IMPORTANT AND SADLY TOO-LITTLE-KNOWN STORY WITH SKILL AND EFFICIENCY. THE FASCINATING SUBJECT MATTER GAINS RESONANCE WITH ITS MODERN-DAY PARALLELS TO THE WAR ON TERRORISM."
- THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER


"DAVID STRATHAIRN HOLDS THE WHOLE THING TOGETHER WITH A COMPELLING PERFORMANCE AS REAL-LIFE FBI AGENT WILLIAM J. FLYNN"
- CHICAGO READER


"PRESENTS A FASCINATING PERIOD IN MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY"
- THE NEW YORK TIMES


"THE GREAT DAVID STRATHAIRN (“GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD LUCK,” “LINCOLN”) CAN MAKE ANY FILM WATCHABLE"
- NEW YORK DAILY NEWS


"GREEN'S HISTORICAL DILIGENCE PROVES REWARDING"
- THE VILLAGE VOICE


"AMBITIOUS IN A WAY THAT MORE EXPENSIVE FILMS ARE RARELY ALLOWED TO BE ANYMORE, ILLUMINATING A FASCINATING, UNDEREXPLORED ERA OF AMERICAN HISTORY."
- THE DISSOLVE


"NO GOD NO MASTER DOES FOR NEW YORK IN THE TEENS WHAT MIDNIGHT IN PARIS DID FOR FRANCE IN THE 20S, BUT WITH MORE DIGNITY AND LESS “WHIMSY."
- MOVIES WITH BUTTER


"NO GOD, NO MASTER IS AN ENGAGING HISTORICAL POLITICAL THRILLER THAT CONFRONTS MANY OF TODAY’S PROBLEMS BY REVISITING THE TROUBLED TIMES OF A LONG AGO ERA… SUSPENSEFUL. STRATHAIRN MAKES A VERY BELIEVABLE, MORALLY-CONFLICTED HERO."
- WE ARE MOVIE GEEKS


"LIKE 12 YEARS A SLAVE, A DARK CHAPTER AND NECESSARY CONVERSATION IN AMERICAN HISTORY, BROUGHT TO LIFE ON THE SCREEN. AND A CAUTIONARY DRAMATIC ILLUMINATION, TOUCHING ON HOW AN UNEXAMINED HISTORY IS DOOMED TO REPEAT ITSELF TODAY."
- PRAIRIE MILLER, WBAI RADIO


"NO GOD, NO MASTER IS AT ITS BEST WHEN IT STICKS WITH STRAITHAIRN, WHO BRINGS AN ADDED HUMANITY TO A ROLE DESIGNED TO CELEBRATE THE VALUE OF THAT VERY TRAIT."
- MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL


"NO GOD, NO MASTER ARTFULLY DEPICTS HISTORY. ALWAYS REMINDING US THAT THIS IS A TRUE STORY, CREATES AN EVEN MORE POWERFUL FILM."
- REEL HONEST REVIEWS


Synopsis

When a series of package bombs show up on the doorsteps of prominent politicians and businessmen in the summer of 1919, U.S. Bureau of Investigation Agent William Flynn (Strathairn) is assigned the task of finding those responsible. He becomes immersed in an investigation that uncovers an anarchist plot to destroy democracy. Inspired by true events of the 20’s the film sets the stage for a timely thriller with resoundingly similar parallels to the contemporary war on terrorism and the role government plays to defeat it.
Cast & Crew

Directed, Written, and Produced By: Terry Green

Starring: David Strathairn (Academy Award Nominee & two time Golden Globe Nominee & Independent Spirit Award Winner, star of Good Night, and Good Luck; Lincoln, and The Borne Ultimatum) , Sam Witwer (Emmy Nominee, co-starring role on “Being Human”, and Crank), and Alessandro Mario, Ray Wise


Sam Witwer
Alessandro Mario
Ray Wise

From the Director

The disintegration of civil liberties during times of social unrest is nothing new in America. I set out to make a film about the Sacco and Vanzetti saga, the anarchist movement they belonged to, and the cause they dedicated their lives to advancing. Like all stories that need to be understood at the mythic level, this is a part of a nation's history that should inform the present era and future of the country.

Post-World War I was a volatile period in America. The fear of Communism was sweeping the nation. The government began arresting anyone they suspected of being a radical and it didn't take much to get on their list. Immigrants who had worked and lived in the United States for decades were suddenly labeled undesirables and detained without due process for several weeks, even months. U.S. Attorney General Alexander Palmer's solution to the problem was the deportation of thousands of naturalized citizens, the vast majority of whom were of Italian and Russian descent.

Events eerily similar to those of the early 20th Century have recurred too many times in our country's history. We haven't learned how to stop the cycle. Until we do, we are all at risk when our leaders suppress the freedoms of ordinary people in the name of national security.

This film is a tribute to those who have stood tall for human rights in the face of adversity.

—Terry Green


Character Bios

William J. Flynn (David Strathairn) began his government career as an agent in the United States Secret Service, building a reputation as an “anarchist expert”—someone who understood the culture and politics of American radicalism. A native New Yorker, Flynn joined the fledgling Bureau of Investigation where he was assigned the daunting task of hunting down saboteurs whose bomb plot during the summer of 1919 had targeted several of America’s most influential kings of industry, including John D. Rockefeller, Sr. and J.P. Morgan. It was a pinnacle assignment that would embroil him in a conflict between the U.S. government and its immigrant population.

Alexander Mitchell Palmer (Ray Wise) was Attorney General of the United States from 1919 to 1921, a time when American Imperialism was being challenged globally. Progressive and fearless, Palmer’s answer to the question of how to handle threats by violent radicals was to capture and deport them. Palmer believed that communism was “eating its way into the homes of the American workman” and vowed to subdue any such subversive influences. In 1919 and 1920, he staged a series of arrests—the Palmer Raids—in cities across the U.S., rounding up thousands of suspects, many of whom had built the very cities in which they were arrested, and detaining them until deportation could be arranged.

Eugenio Ravarini (Sam Witwer) was a secret informant for the U.S. government during the Red Scare of 1919. He successfully identified and assisted in the arrests of countless “enemies of the state” and was eventually put on the payroll of the Bureau of Investigation, given the mission of infiltrating the Italian anarchist movement and often posing as a militant actionist. Ravarini was extremely useful to the government’s fight against radicalism, employing a keen sense of Machiavellian ingenuity and demonstrating a consistent knack for penetrating the inner circles of the anarchist movement.

J. Edgar Hoover (Sean McNall) was a 24 year old attorney for the U.S. Justice Department in 1919 under the tutelage of Attorney General Palmer. He was named head of the General Intelligence Division, which gave him the power to influence government policies against radicals. Hoover fed the names and addresses of anyone who might fit the profile of a radical to Palmer and together, they launched a campaign against discontented immigrants that Hoover deemed undesirable. Hoover was adept at finding loopholes in the law that allowed the government to arrest people without due process, a practice he continued for almost half a century as Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

John D. Rockefeller, Sr. (David Darlow) was an oil magnate and the wealthiest man in America at the turn of the 20th Century. The owner of several coal mines, he was blamed for the deaths of two dozen miners during a labor dispute in Ludlow, Colorado, where shots were fired by Colorado militiamen into a tent city in an attempt to persuade striking workers to return to the mines—a tragedy that claimed the lives of 11 children and three women. Rockefeller’s adamant stance against unionization contributed to the event and led to violent protests against his family.

Carlo Tresca (Edoardo Ballerini) was an Italian-born American newspaper editor, orator, labor organizer and leader of the Industrial Workers of the World, a workers’ union intent on abolishing the wage system. He helped stage the Lawrence Textile Strike in 1912, as well as the strikes at Ludlow, Colorado. Across the nation the IWW rallied for workers’ rights and many of its members were avowed anarchists, which put them on J. Edgar Hoover’s list of suspects. While not violent in nature, Tresca remained a thorn in the side of the political and economic elite, a moniker he wore proudly and without apology throughout his life.

Louise Berger (Mariana Klaveno) was born in Latvia, Russia. Berger immigrated to the United States in 1911 where she joined the Lettish Anarchist Group, an organization devoted to the publication and dissemination of anarchist literature. She traveled extensively in anarchist circles, serving as editor of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth Bulletin in New York. Berger became a person of interest to the U.S. Justice Department after a homemade bomb exploded prematurely in her apartment, killing three anarchists and a member of the IWW.

Emma Goldman (Mariann Mayberry) was a Russian-born anarchist known for her political activism. Arrested and jailed several times for her views, Goldman’s writings and lectures spanned a wide variety of issues including prisons, atheism, freedom of speech, militarism, capitalism, women’s’ rights, marriage, free love and homosexuality. She was no stranger to the government or to law enforcement, and her outspoken manner often landed her in trouble. A friend to Carlo Tresca, Goldman shared similar philosophies on how best to liberate the American worker from the clutches of capitalism.

Luigi Galleani (Dan Mooney) was an Italian anarchist active in America from 1901 to 1919. Galleani is best known for his enthusiastic advocacy of "propaganda of the deed”—the use of violence to eliminate tyrants and oppressors and to act as a catalyst to the overthrow of existing government institutions. From 1914 to 1932, Galleani's followers in the United States (known as Galleanists) carried out a series of bombings and assassination attempts against institutions and persons they viewed as class enemies.

Nicola Sacco (James Madio) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (Alessandro Mario) were Italian-born immigrants who adhered to the tenants of radical anarchism, and were ardent followers of Luigi Galleani. Arrested in 1920 for the murder of two payroll guards, their trial sparked a firestorm of protests worldwide by people who not only believed in their innocence but also felt they were being used as scapegoats by a failed government policy that systematically targeted foreign-born radicals living in America. Sacco was a shoe peddler, Vanzetti a fishmonger. Their story came to represent the plight of immigrants struggling against the corruption of a bourgeois capitalist system. Both were executed in 1927. Their guilt remains in question to this day.


Poster Art and Stills

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Press Clippings


Exclusive Trailer: David Strathairn Races to Find a Terrorist in Period Piece 'No God, No Master'... Indiewire is pleased to present the official U.S. trailer for Terry Green's "No God, No Master." Starring Oscar-nominee David Strathairn ("Good Night, and Good Luck"), the film is opening this month courtesy of Monterey Media. (more)





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